Matthew Bloch

Matthew Bloch

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Bytemark’s self-built data centre

In February 2013, after over 10-years as a hosting provider, Bytemark made the decision to invest £1.2 million into building our own data centre. Here’s the complete guide to how we made it happen. YO26 Peter and I are proud to announce that we’ve completed the purchase of a building for Bytemark. The name, YO26, is taken […]

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What is BigV? The Unveiling

Note: Since the original publication, BigV has been renamed Bytemark Cloud and offers many new features since the platform launched in 2011. BigV is Bytemark’s very own cloud hosting platform, built in-house. It builds on virtual machine (VM) technology to provide hosting that is both flexible and resilient. Flexibility: You can change your servers’ RAM or […]

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Why Bytemark didn’t use Xen

We’re circling in on a test release of our new hosting system, called BigV.  Bytemark have never thrown more hardware or programmers at a project for so long, so if you’re in our fan club you might like the results.  I’m a little shy of making promises just yet, but I’ll write about a few […]

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The bumpy ride to IPv6

The internet is nearly full.  The space that has been used up isn’t physical – there are still data centres to be built and new web sites to put up, and increasing demand for both – it’s the address space.  Vint Cerf and the other researchers who built the internet’s foundations simply had to pick […]

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Dealing with our first major outage

As a hosting company, high availability is crucial. Bytemark now has a 99% uptime guarantee and a 100% core network guarantee. But back in 2009, we experienced a major networking issue. Which, although quickly resolved, has had a lasting impact on the company in terms of what we learnt from the situation. What was the […]

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root ain’t what it used to be

My own groundhog day is a debate with customers about what constitutes “typical” Linux security precautions.  If you’re a Linux administrator of any experience, you might find some of the following statements rather familiar: My server is secure because Apache runs in a chroot. My web site is secure because I have a hardware firewall!  […]

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